FEBRUARY 2016 ISSUE

FEBRUARY 2016 ISSUE

A sneaky peek of just some of what is in the February 2016 issue – OUT NOW!

Click to buy this issue and read more…

Michael Jackson

BE: Tell me about The Wiz.

Michael: “I saw the Broadway show about seven times. But even before that, I’d always watch The Wizard Of Oz on TV every Christmas. It was a dream come true to get the part of Scarecrow, because he was the character I always loved the most. I think that most kids can identify with him and they always feel sorry for him. My nephews saw the movie and they said they didn’t like it because I got sawn in half by Evilene!

“In the States, when I first appear in the film with the Funky Crows, those birds get hissed and booed at. They are m-e-a-n, y’know!”

BE: Reading the quotes from scraps of paper was a brilliant idea. Was it in the original play?

Michael: “No, in fact although the storyline is almost exactly the same as the Broadway show, there’s a million new ideas that have gone into the film. Each one of those paper bits was put into my clothing just before I was due to take it out.”

Click here to buy and read more…

LunchMoney Lewis

On first glance, LunchMoney Lewis’s Lunchbreak spotify playlist could be that of any young rapper. The hit-making Los Angeleno has rugged hip-hop classics like Wu-Tang Clan’s CREAM [Cash Rules Everything About Me], deep album cuts like Jay-Z’s Lenny Kravitz-featuring Guns And Roses, and newer offerings like Earl Sweatshirt’s typically cathartic Faucet. It’s what you might expect from one of rap’s up and comers – something old, something new, something you might have missed. But sprinkled within the mix are Lewis’ less hip-hop-friendly pop favourites. There’s Maroon 5’s This Summer, Gwen Stefani’s Long Way To Go, Elliphant’s Love Me Badder, and Alessia Cara’s Here. It suggests someone with a hip-hop head’s heart and a pop ear.

Click here to buy and read more…

 

African Head Charge

Bonjo Iyabinghi Noah is standing by the roadside in Accra, Ghana, his voice almost drowned out by traffic noises and the clamour of passers-by. The elderly Rastaman is the musical driving force behind African Head Charge – the radical dub group whose first four albums, produced by Adrian Sherwood, have recently been reissued on the latter’s On U Sound label.

“When I was very young I was influenced by this man Count Ossie and The Mystic Revelation Of Rastafari. He influenced everybody. My grandmother’s sister, her name was Nana Bunchie, and she had a Rasta camp in Clarendon, which was the first Rasta camp after Pinnacle…

Click here to buy and read more…

 

Lee Perry

You’ve got to hand it to Lee “Scratch” Perry. The legendary Jamaican producer hasn’t made a decent album in 30 years – well OK, maybe just a couple – and yet he’s constantly being asked to record more. It was once his skills at the mixing-board that set the reggae world alight, but that all changed after he burned down the Black Ark studio in the late seventies. Since then, he’s become a reggae court jester – talking in riddles and acting as mad as a hatter, whilst cleverly reinventing himself as a recording and performing artist…

Click here to buy and read more…